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The New Normal

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452 – The Annual, 2017-18

 

BY DEBRA VEY VODA-HAMILTON, ESQ./MEDIATOR

The title of this month’s article is in response to unexpected things now occurring at a dog show. It could also be titled, Prepare for the Unexpected. Many exhibitors have noticed the heightened awareness of passers-by to the presence of show dogs in a car or van. This increased vigilance by Good Samaritans has lead to police being called to a restaurant or hotel parking lot because dogs are believed to be in danger. How we as a member of this sport respond to these events will dictate whether the public at large will become gratefully educated or disgruntled. Choosing to educate and not defend our practices may be the difference be- tween working alongside law enforcement and local communities where we hold shows and being harassed by both each time the dog show comes into town.

How can we peacefully and proactively respond to questions about our dogs in our rigs? What proactive steps will make it easier to initiate a conversation from an attitude of appreciation? All it takes is preparing for the Good Samaritan before he/she shows up at your van. If you are traveling with your own pets, make sure all your personal information, each dogs information and information alerting someone to your emergency contact person is in easy reach.

For those of you who have had accidents on your way to or from a show, having this information at your fingertips is a blessing. If you have to search for it, your dogs may end up at a shelter. And what if you are injured or unconscious? If the information about your dog’s licensing, vaccination, microchip registration and the emergency care of your dog if something happens to you is not easily accessible to medical and law enforcement personnel on the scene, they will not look for it. Law enforcement officers may let a dog show colleague take your dogs if you are conscious, give permission and they are at the scene. However, it is within their police powers to place the dogs in the care of local animal care and control if they feel clear directives are not available.

Click here to read the complete article
452 – The Annual, 2017-18

Short URL: http://caninechronicle.com/?p=137617

Posted by on Jan 18 2018. Filed under Current Articles, Featured. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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