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Looking Around With Lee – The Saluki – A Discussion

Click here to read the complete article
82 – February 2017

By Lee Canalizo

This month I’m starting a new project for my readers! I looked around and this is what I found! So much breed knowledge is available to all if we look for it. I’m going to concentrate on one breed per month and present the views and feelings of several longtime, knowledgeable people in each respective breed. I’ll start with the breeds that I personally am involved with and continue from there in future articles.

Our first column spotlights the Saluki breed. These comments were made by people that have been involved continually for the past 40 years!

Cathy Denier Farrell
Gemini Salukis

Thanks for asking me, Lee! Your questions made me think and rethink a few things.

What do I see in present day Salukis that I did not see 40 years ago?

I would have to say consistency in breeding programs. I believe, in general, overall quality is better.

With the internet, Facebook, live streaming shows from around the world, photos and videos being shared worldwide coupled with the fabulous online tool of the Saluki Archives, we as breeders are more aware of what others are doing. Using frozen semen–a rarity only a few decades ago–is now common practice.

All this has helped us who study and have a vision of the ideal saluki, as we now have so many more options for our programs.

I see better acceptance of the types within the breed amongst breeders that understand it may not be what they bred for but it is a good saluki.

However, I also see some very intense extremes in Salukis right now. From over-angulated caricatures to the other end of the spectrum of Salukis that are under-angulated; both being of equal detriment for a functional hound.

Salukis were breed to cover long distances over wide ranges of terrains. Their movement at the trot or gallop must be maintained over long distance. The gait must be free flowing. Any exaggerations from either end of the spectrum will create the lack of athleticism and body control needed to run at the speeds with the endurance they were meant to possess.

Some of the photos I see of Salukis stacked show lack of understanding of what a moderate saluki should be.

What did I see 40 years ago that I don’t see today?

Walking knowledge! Those fabulous people with a lifetime
of experience, in and out of this breed, that were great dog people
and mentors are missing.

Click here to read the complete article
82 – February 2017
 

Short URL: http://caninechronicle.com/?p=119784

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