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IMHO – Q&A with Today’s Experienced Judges

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250 – June, 2018

BY ELAINE LESSIG

WE ASKED AKC JUDGES THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS: WHAT GOES INTO YOUR DECISION TO WEIGH OR MEASURE A DOG? AND SHOULD ATTENDANCE AT A NATIONAL SPECIALTY BE A REQUIREMENT BEFORE APPLYING FOR ANY BREED?

Mrs. Elaine Lessig
AKC Judge

Q: What goes into your decision to weigh or measure a dog?

When an exhibit enters the ring which appears to be too tall, short, heavy or light for a particular breed, I call for the scale for a weight concern or the wicket if height is the issue and the standard for that breed has a required height or weight which if not met disqualifies. The other consideration is does the disqualification apply to dogs of all ages in that breed. If it does not, a birth date must be established too before the dog may be weighed or wicketed.

Q: Should attendance at a national specialty be a requirement before applying for any breed?

The American Kennel Club judging application process offers a variety of educational options for judges to select in their quest to acquire the knowledge they need to successfully gain permit status. The points assigned to attending a national specialty, going to the Judges’ Education seminar, doing the hands-on work-shop, and participating in ringside mentoring give it greater importance than other components. There are other enriching options which may provide an equally well-rounded set of experiences. We all learn differently and are wise to choose those experiences which give us the strongest foundation.

Mrs. Vicki Seiler Cushman
AKC Judge

Q: What goes into your decision to weigh or measure a dog?

After more than 45 years of watching these breeds it is pretty easy to say if it looks wrong, it’s wrong.

Q: Should attendance at a national specialty be a requirement before applying for any breed?

No. However, I love to go to national specialties for the many opportunities to talk to important thought leaders in the breed, see and understand the concerns in the breed today, and quite frankly many top breeders do not go to all-breed shows as they only attend specialties. Another learning opportunity at nationals would be their breed specific events such as herding, retrieving and temperament tests; this provides a deeper understanding of their purpose. For a real student, I say go if the opportunity is there.

Click here to read the complete article
250 – June, 2018

Short URL: http://caninechronicle.com/?p=145397

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