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Life With Pat

140 – May, 2010

From the archives of The Canine Chronicle, May, 2010

by Pat Gellerman

There seems to be a great amount of misinformation and confusion about where newcomers should go to purchase or acquire their first dog. Many of those who are interested will go to dog shows and ask assistance from fanciers and judges.

They get all sorts of answers and are even discouraged about finding a dog. One answer I overheard from a judge to a prospective dog owner was to not get a dog at all if they worked during the day. In this day and age most couples work and they could look into daycare for their pets just as they do for their children. There are numerous services which will feed and exercise dogs during the day and also stay overnight when the owners travel. Many judges who are away use these services.

It is the responsibility of AKC judges and personnel to advise dog lovers on what breed to get according to their lifestyle. Many prospective buyers will answer, “I don’t want a show dog”. Make sure you inform them that show dogs are wonderful, loving pets who are usually in shows for a few years and then retire to loving homes. Remind these people that breeders who show their dogs breed for health and temperament and that is why they should consider getting their dogs from respectible breeders. You also must inquire about the buyer’s lifestyle. Do they have children? What are their ages? What about a fenced-in yard?

An example of a show dog going to a loving home is from the nurse in my doctor’s office who wanted a terrier. I gave her the name of a local breeder-judge who luckily had a dog she wanted to place in a good home. Both new owner and terrier are very happy in their new living situation.

Many purebreds who are campaigned for a few years retire at the age of four and either stay with their handler or go back to the breeder. They then live a leisurely life, perhaps having puppies and watching their offspring go into the show world. This retired show dog would make a wonderful house pet since he is already house-broken, has been discouraged from barking, and has very good manners on a leash.

We must not forget about breed rescue groups. Visiting these groups will give you thoughts on what breed would suit your household.

New owners should be aware that AKC opened performance events to non-purebred dogs effective April 1, 2010. This is something dog owners can find out about by getting in touch with the AKC.

I find it extremely necessary for judges and fanciers to assist those dog lovers to find the right dog for their living situations. We have a wealth of knowledge to give these dog lovers and want to add them to the growing dog family.

From the archives of The Canine Chronicle, May, 2010

Short URL: http://caninechronicle.com/?p=1145

Posted by on Jun 16 2020. Filed under Dog Show History, Featured, Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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