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The Rare Breed

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142 – September, 2020

By Gregg G. Kantak

Recently, I was asked to pay a kennel visit and review a litter of puppies of a rare – and newly recognized – breed. Then again, this story began in 2016, when this breeder-owner-handler walked into my ring during an Open Show for Foundation Stock and Miscellaneous breeds.

At the time, I was unaware that was her first time at a conformation show. Previously, she had focused primarily on agility and obedience. Nor did I know then that her primary breed was Rottweiler, yet she was exhibiting a rare toy breed. For the proceeding three years, she entered under me. Each time, she left my ring empty-handed. The last time she left my ring, I clearly recall her visible disappointment. Before she left the show, I pulled her aside and urged her to continue with conformation, to learn, to become comfortable with ring procedure and how to highlight the hallmarks of her breed while in the ring. Little did I also know, she soon would acquire the first agility title on this rare toy breed, and her heart remained in that arena.

Fast-forward three years and I received an email and phone call that she wanted my husband and me to have a kennel visit and evaluate her first litter. With the agreement that any evaluation would preclude her from entering under us for a time specific, we agreed. Though timing precluded that evaluation, our conversation left me so energized for her. In the time away from conformation, she advised me that she had taken the critical steps to learn everything she could about her new breed, studying the specifics of pedigree and breeding programs, relying on the writings of Pat Hastings, several books and articles, her breed mentor (who is also my long-term mentor) and others. Those studies led her to pursue health screening. She discovered that, as the breed is rare and predominant gene pools are imported, knowing what specific health issues to screen would be almost impossible. So, she chose to rely on tried and true health testing used by many reputable breeders – CERF (Canine Eye Registration Foundation) eyes, OFA (Orthopedic Foundation for Animals), patella, etc.

Click here to read the complete article
142 – September, 2020

Short URL: http://caninechronicle.com/?p=189742

Posted by on Sep 25 2020. Filed under Current Articles, Featured. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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